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Museum shop

Winter opening times

The museum is open every day between 11 am and 3 pm from November to February. But we do not close the doors on visitors if they wish to stay a little later. We are pleased to see you!

Welcome to the museum

There are over 1000 pieces on show on two floors, including many unique and never before seen pieces from glass maker's archives. On the ground floor we showcase the Island's many glass studios, including Isle of Wight Studio Glass, Diamond Isle Sculptured Glass, Glory Art Glass and Alum Bay Glass as well as related studios such as Jonathan Harris Studio Glass. We also have a stunning collection of Mdina glass from the period between 1968 and 1972, many pieces signed by Michael Harris. There are designs by Michael from the 1950s and when he was at the Royal College of Art in London in the 1960s too. We also have a fascinating and growing collection of French, German and British Art Deco as well as Victorian glass on the first floor.

Museum redevelopment

The museum opened in March 2016 after a great deal of work. But we are not standing still. Our aim is to continually improve the visitor experience as resources allow. Currently we are planning extensive changes to greatly enhance the visitor experience. These include a more exciting layout, storyboards and graphics, touch screen computers full of helpful information for visitors to use, and a library.

We are aiming to install these improvements during December 2017 to February 2018. During this time the museum will remain open, but on some days we will be moving things around and installing equipment and displays. We may have to temporarily restrict access to parts of the museum while these works are carried out. Our aim is keep these to an absolute minimum. No matter what, there is always something interesting to see at the museum.

As part of the redevelopment work the museum shop will be closed from December 2017 to February 2018. But online sales will continue uninterrupted via this web site.

Free wifi in the museum

Wifi is free in the museum. Just ask for the password.

Glass jewellery workshops

Julie Ann Gaterell, our education programme director, holds workshops on making dichroic fused glass jewellery. If you are interested, please contact Julie Ann directly.

Julie Ann Arts Dichroic Fused Glass Jewellery Workshop

What's New

New exhibits

Huge Renaissance II footed platter

Renaissance II footed platter designed by Jonathan Harris for Isle of Wight Studio Glass. It is a massive 47 cm in diameter, 8 cm high, with a foot 11.5 cm in diameter. This is an extremely rare piece. It is likely that only a handful were made.

Etling triangular bowl

This triangular bowl was made for Edmond Etling in the 1920s and is numbered 93 in the Choisy-le-Roi catalogue. It measures about 22 cm corner to corner and is 3.5 cm high.

Trial Azurene vase made by Michael Harris or Chris Hotton

A unique Isle of Wight Studio Glass Azurene 'Black' freeblown vase, 19 cm high x 20 cm at the widest point, made by Michael Harris or Chris Hotton as a trial piece about 1978-79, with impressed 'flame' pontil to the base, as shown on page 85 of Michael Harris: Mdina Glass & Isle of Wight Studio Glass, by Mark Hill. This vase was formerly in the Mark Hill collection.

Mdina button top fish vase by Michael Harris

Cobalt blue Mdina button top fish vase made by Michael Harris probably in early 1969. The button top is characteristic of the earliest fish vases made at Mdina.

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Inside the museum

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Blog

Signs, more signs, and even more signs! - 07 Aug 2016 13:20

Tags: brianmarriott signs

Isle of Wight Glass Museum directional sign

The museum is working hard to improve the visitor experience. Clearly, visitors need to find us and once in the museum know what they are looking at. To help with that the museum commissioned a series of directional signs at Arreton Barns and signs inside the museum. They are now in place. And they look great! - Click here to read more - Comments: 0


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